A little Blip

Yikes! Ignore the hair!

Yikes! Ignore the hair!

Firstly, thanks so much for praying for the latest eye surgery… things went very well – until a tiny blip recorded on my heart monitor. I heard them say, “she’s quickly converted; we’ll continue.” which never registered since the shot they gave me truly allowed me to care nothing about what they said or did.

In the recovery room a nurse began to ask what I assumed were normal questions after surgery; “Who was my local doctor?” “Who prescribed my one and only prescription?” “Who was my cardiologist?” and  “When was my last physical?”

My answers like, “I guess my local doctor would be in Radford, VA.”, and “Oh that was from my doctor in the Philippines.” drew more and more nurses over to my little curtained cubicle until there wasn’t room for any one else. One outside the curtain fairly gasped, “She has no local doctor!” and I couldn’t yet focus enough to decide her attitude, but it was there. After my answer about a cardiologist,  “(snicker)… cardiOLOgist?” and the following one going something like, “Oh, I think maybe about 15 years ago or maybe not.”

That was the answer that dashed them over the precipice.

I am grateful I regained the presence of mind to actually NOT say, “I don’t think I’ve ever had one.”

They rushed to get the surgeon. He already left. Phones came out and doctor names bounced in the air until one landed a rushed appointment the day later. He’s a cardiologist.

I arrived at his office and couldn’t imagine being there. I never go to the doctor! Refer my apparent disturbing answer to the nurses’ last question. I hadn’t been back in the states a year and already had two surgeries and now a cardiology appointment. (The sixties are not being nice to me.)

The extremely tall (I so miss normal-sized Filipinos) but very nice doctor explained my blip is atrial fibrillation and is the most common cardiac arrhythmia…(heart rhythm disorder). It may cause no symptoms, (which was true for me) but it is often associated with palpitations, fainting, chest pain, or congestive heart failure. Then he looked at me and said in a very thick accent, “Most likely it was anesthesia, but we will make sure.”

I’m wearing a heart monitor for 24 hours and will eventually have an echocardiogram of my heart’s beat.

All this to say, he was very supportive of my calm attitude about it all as I was still amazed to even be in a cardiologist’s office.

Oh, and a nice receptionist penciled my name into a slot with my local doctor (at least he’s stateside!) next week in Radford, VA.

About Chris and Lynne Strange

We serve the Lord in the beautiful state of West Virginia. We were missionaries with New Tribes Mission and served ten years on the island of Mindanao, Philippines. View all posts by Chris and Lynne Strange

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